WHO ARE WE?

 Sacred Geometry Healing Arts treatment philosophy is based on providing clients with state of the art care that combines the extraordinary healing capacity of Classical Chinese Acupuncture with the biomechanical and anatomic principles of western Physical Therapy. Treatment procedures are specific to the client and labor intensive with regards to both treatment and patient education. Treatment sessions are one on one and typically last one to two hours depending on the nature of the complaint and the protocols utilized. The objective of client care is complete resolution of complaint through identification and accurate diagnosis, treatment specific to the individual, and appropriate patient education to prevent recurrence.

ACUPUNCTURE IN NEW YORK STATE

Acupuncture is a NYS licensed medical profession and an ancient form of Chinese medicine based on the manipulation of the free flow of internal energy through the body known as “Qi”. Treatment is effected through the insertion of very fine, sterile needles at specific points in the body to achieve the desired therapeutic effect. Needles utilized are rounded, or filiform, and insertion is painless. All needling procedures are performed in strict accordance with established NYS clean needle technique and OSHA guidelines with client safety and comfort our utmost concern.

HOW DOES ACUPUNCTURE WORK?

Acupuncture functions by manipulating the free flow of internal energy or “Qi”, throughout the body through the insertion of very fine needles at specific points along established energetic meridians. Good health results from a free flow of “Qi”, poor health and pain result from a poor or stagnated flow of “Qi”. The art of the medicine lies in the diagnosis of the energetic level at which the pathology or problem lies and the correct needling protocol to re-establish a smooth flow of “Qi”.

THE THREE MAJOR LEVELS OF QI 

There are three major levels of “Qi” found in all living organisms, from superficial to deep.

Wei Qi, aka defensive Qi, or superficial Qi.  Wei Qi is found on the surface or superficial level of the body and is energetically responsible for the the skin, muscles, bones, and joints.

Ying Qi, or intermediate Qi.  Ying Qi is a more refined form of Wei Qi and is found at the intermediate or organ level. Ying Qi is responsible for the smooth functioning of the internal organs.

Yuan, or constitutional Qi,  is found at the deepest level. The most refined and rarefied form of Qi.

CLASSICAL ACUPUNCTURE

 Classical Acupuncture treatments are comparatively labor intensive and time consuming.  Particular attention is paid to the manner of insertion and manipulation of each needle (which differ markedly for each type of meridian), and to the resulting intricate changes to the flow of qi in the meridians.  It is this special attention to detail along with diagnoses not limited to pattern simplifications, and the correct choice of meridian, that can elicit remarkable and profound changes in the health and perspectives of Classical Acupuncture patients.

 As in any form of acupuncture, disposable sterile single-use needles are used.  Strict safety controls are observed in accordance with Federal and OSHA regulations.  Patients are treated one at a time during their scheduled appointment.  First appointments must be made by the patient unless the patient is unable to speak or hear, or unless the patient is a minor.

A VERY BRIEF HISTORY OF CLASSICAL ACUPUNCTURE

 Nearly all acupuncturists today in the United States and in China practice a modernized and vastly simplified version of acupuncture which is distinctly different to the medical practices that existed in China prior to Communism. This simplified, modernized practice is known by the somewhat misleading name “Traditional Chinese Medicine” (TCM), and was developed during the enormous cultural change in China in the 20th century.

 Following the Revolution of 1911 which marked the end of the last (the Qing) dynasty, a period of intense Westernization occurred. The established medicine which had reached its height of development between the 2nd and 12th centuries and which had served the country immeasurably well, was banned because it had come to be viewed as outdated or a quaint curiosity that was unsuited for a new society aspiring to new ideals. Little room was left for China’s ancient and spiritually rich practices of the past.  The re-invention of the wheel began.

 After Communism was introduced in 1949, a long period of mass nationalization and sweeping reform took place. All aspects of Chinese culture, ranging from medicine to martial arts and even dance were standardized in accordance with the Communist ideal. Under Mao, prominent medical practitioners from throughout the country were gathered into committees for the purpose of formulating standardization. They were directed to construct a version of the practice of acupuncture whose formulaic nature could be relatively easily and quickly learned en masse; one that could be taught relatively quickly to practitioners in remote regions; one that could be used to treat large numbers of patients concurrently. Ultimately, these committees of prominent doctors developed a curriculum which was then enforced in all the schools that were teaching Chinese medicine. The new modern practice which could well have been called MCM (Modern Chinese Medicine), became known as TCM (Traditional Chinese Medicine), and as with all things political, adopted a moniker representing an uncomfortable mix of fact and fiction.

 In order to facilitate the speedy training of new practitioners, much of the subtlety, and some may argue the spiritual bedrock, of diagnosis and treatment of diseases which is explained in detail in the various Classical (particularly Han dynasty) texts was omitted. In the broadest terms, meridians (energy pathways) were simplified and pathological conditions were grouped into about 80 “patterns” (groups of symptoms) for standardized diagnoses and treatments. In many cases, whole tracts of theory were disregarded as part of the deliberate effort to simplify the practice. These omissions can be cited as reasons for the often held belief today that acupuncture is not always effective or that it must be accompanied by herbs in order to function effectively. Herbal supplementation is not necessary with Classical Acupuncture, although attention to modifications in one’s diet is often critical for a treatment to be both effective and long-lasting.

 Classical Acupuncture utilizes 68 energetic meridians, while TCM mainly utilizes the 12 primary channels and extends a gesture towards 2 of the 8 extraordinary vessels omitting Divergent, Luo and Sinew meridians from TCM practice entirely. With a vast array of options available to them, practitioners of Classical Acupuncture are able to choose any or a combination of the 68 meridians for very specific treatment.

THE 68 ENERGETIC MERIDIANS USED IN CLASSICAL CHINESE MEDICINE

  • 6 Cutaneous regions for acute musculoskeletal complaints.
  • 12 Sinew meridians for acute and chronic musculoskeletal disorders.
    Disease range: pulled muscles from one day to one week’s duration, and burns.
  • 12 Primary meridians for a very wide array of disorders. (These are the 12 meridians of TCM.)
  • 16 Luo meridians for emotional, psychological, blood and some musculoskeletal disorders.
    Disease range: moodiness all the way through to schizophrenia and multiple sclerosis.
  • 12 Divergent meridians for chronic musculoskeletal conditions, auto-immune, immunological, and oncological conditions.
    Disease range: chronic back pain through to cancer.
  • 8 Extraordinary meridians for constitutional restructuring, childhood illness and injuries, and illness which originated in childhood.
    Disease range: food intolerances and other allergies which originated in childhood. Moderation of birth defects and psychological disorders originating from birth, birth trauma or early childhood.
  • 2 Bisecting abdominal meridians for urogenital and reproductive health.

TREATMENT COURSE LENGTHS

These vary according to the type of meridian implicated. Classical protocols vary in length dependent on the energetic class of channel utilized, however all Classical protocols can be performed quite successfully with treatment performed on a weekly basis.

  • Most often, considerable benefit is felt after one treatment. After two to four treatments, there is a very clear indication of the effect of the treatment. Many acute conditions can even resolve in that initial period.

PHYSICAL THERAPY

Physical Therapy as practiced by Sacred Geometry Healing Arts utilizes detailed movement based analysis and the effects of repetitive or pathological movement to diagnose and identify the underlying cause of pain or disability. Clients are instructed in the cause of injury following a detailed evaluation and following diagnosis, are instructed in appropriate body mechanics, joint conservation, posture, and exercise to correct the underlying pathology and prevent recurrence of injury. Sacred Geometry Healing Arts also makes extensive use of state of the art manual therapy techniques which are 100% painless and can afford immediate and remarkable recovery from pain and disability from a wide variety of musculoskeletal injuries.

RESTORATIVE MASSAGE

Sacred Geometry Restorative Massage is a unique form of Asian bodywork based on principles of Chinese medicine that primarily utilizes the forearm and affords deep, full, and thorough movement of soft tissue without pain to the client or repetitive motion injury to the clinician. The massage protocol, or “kata”, is a full body massage that is an outstanding form of sports massage, a means of maintaining good musculoskeletal health, and a compatible and complementary modality when used in conjunction with Classical Acupuncture or traditional western Physical Therapy.  

WHO ARE WE?
 Sacred Geometry Healing Arts treatment philosophy is based on providing clients with state of the art care that combines the extraordinary healing capacity of Classical Chinese Acupuncture with the biomechanical and anatomic principles of western Physical Therapy. Treatment procedures are specific to the client and labor intensive with regards to both treatment and patient education. Treatment sessions are one on one and typically last one to two hours depending on the nature of the complaint and the protocols utilized. The objective of client care is complete resolution of complaint through identification and accurate diagnosis, treatment specific to the individual, and appropriate patient education to prevent recurrence.

ACUPUNCTURE IN NEW YORK STATE

Acupuncture is a NYS licensed medical profession and an ancient form of Chinese medicine based on the manipulation of the free flow of internal energy through the body known as “Qi”. Treatment is effected through the insertion of very fine, sterile needles at specific points in the body to achieve the desired therapeutic effect. Needles utilized are rounded, or filiform, and insertion is painless. All needling procedures are performed in strict accordance with established NYS clean needle technique and OSHA guidelines with client safety and comfort our utmost concern.

HOW DOES ACUPUNCTURE WORK?

Acupuncture functions by manipulating the free flow of internal energy or “Qi”, throughout the body through the insertion of very fine needles at specific points along established energetic meridians. Good health results from a free flow of “Qi”, poor health and pain result from a poor or stagnated flow of “Qi”. The art of the medicine lies in the diagnosis of the energetic level at which the pathology or problem lies and the correct needling protocol to re-establish a smooth flow of “Qi”.

THE THREE MAJOR LEVELS OF QI 

There are three major levels of “Qi” found in all living organisms, from superficial to deep.

Wei Qi, aka defensive Qi, or superficial Qi.  Wei Qi is found on the surface or superficial level of the body and is energetically responsible for the the skin, muscles, bones, and joints.

Ying Qi, or intermediate Qi.  Ying Qi is a more refined form of Wei Qi and is found at the intermediate or organ level. Ying Qi is responsible for the smooth functioning of the internal organs.

Yuan, or constitutional Qi,  is found at the deepest level. The most refined and rarefied form of Qi.

CLASSICAL ACUPUNCTURE

 Classical Acupuncture treatments are comparatively labor intensive and time consuming.  Particular attention is paid to the manner of insertion and manipulation of each needle (which differ markedly for each type of meridian), and to the resulting intricate changes to the flow of qi in the meridians.  It is this special attention to detail along with diagnoses not limited to pattern simplifications, and the correct choice of meridian, that can elicit remarkable and profound changes in the health and perspectives of Classical Acupuncture patients.

 As in any form of acupuncture, disposable sterile single-use needles are used.  Strict safety controls are observed in accordance with Federal and OSHA regulations.  Patients are treated one at a time during their scheduled appointment.  First appointments must be made by the patient unless the patient is unable to speak or hear, or unless the patient is a minor.

 

A VERY BRIEF HISTORY OF CLASSICAL ACUPUNCTURE

 Nearly all acupuncturists today in the United States and in China practice a modernized and vastly simplified version of acupuncture which is distinctly different to the medical practices that existed in China prior to Communism. This simplified, modernized practice is known by the somewhat misleading name “Traditional Chinese Medicine” (TCM), and was developed during the enormous cultural change in China in the 20th century.

 Following the Revolution of 1911 which marked the end of the last (the Qing) dynasty, a period of intense Westernization occurred. The established medicine which had reached its height of development between the 2nd and 12th centuries and which had served the country immeasurably well, was banned because it had come to be viewed as outdated or a quaint curiosity that was unsuited for a new society aspiring to new ideals. Little room was left for China’s ancient and spiritually rich practices of the past.  The re-invention of the wheel began.

 After Communism was introduced in 1949, a long period of mass nationalization and sweeping reform took place. All aspects of Chinese culture, ranging from medicine to martial arts and even dance were standardized in accordance with the Communist ideal. Under Mao, prominent medical practitioners from throughout the country were gathered into committees for the purpose of formulating standardization. They were directed to construct a version of the practice of acupuncture whose formulaic nature could be relatively easily and quickly learned en masse; one that could be taught relatively quickly to practitioners in remote regions; one that could be used to treat large numbers of patients concurrently. Ultimately, these committees of prominent doctors developed a curriculum which was then enforced in all the schools that were teaching Chinese medicine. The new modern practice which could well have been called MCM (Modern Chinese Medicine), became known as TCM (Traditional Chinese Medicine), and as with all things political, adopted a moniker representing an uncomfortable mix of fact and fiction.

 In order to facilitate the speedy training of new practitioners, much of the subtlety, and some may argue the spiritual bedrock, of diagnosis and treatment of diseases which is explained in detail in the various Classical (particularly Han dynasty) texts was omitted. In the broadest terms, meridians (energy pathways) were simplified and pathological conditions were grouped into about 80 “patterns” (groups of symptoms) for standardized diagnoses and treatments. In many cases, whole tracts of theory were disregarded as part of the deliberate effort to simplify the practice. These omissions can be cited as reasons for the often held belief today that acupuncture is not always effective or that it must be accompanied by herbs in order to function effectively. Herbal supplementation is not necessary with Classical Acupuncture, although attention to modifications in one’s diet is often critical for a treatment to be both effective and long-lasting.

 Classical Acupuncture utilizes 68 energetic meridians, while TCM mainly utilizes the 12 primary channels and extends a gesture towards 2 of the 8 extraordinary vessels omitting Divergent, Luo and Sinew meridians from TCM practice entirely. With a vast array of options available to them, practitioners of Classical Acupuncture are able to choose any or a combination of the 68 meridians for very specific treatment.

THE 68 ENERGETIC MERIDIANS USED IN CLASSICAL CHINESE MEDICINE

  • 6 Cutaneous regions for acute musculoskeletal complaints.
  • 12 Sinew meridians for acute and chronic musculoskeletal disorders.
    Disease range: pulled muscles from one day to one week’s duration, and burns.
  • 12 Primary meridians for a very wide array of disorders. (These are the 12 meridians of TCM.)
  • 16 Luo meridians for emotional, psychological, blood and some musculoskeletal disorders.
    Disease range: moodiness all the way through to schizophrenia and multiple sclerosis.
  • 12 Divergent meridians for chronic musculoskeletal conditions, auto-immune, immunological, and oncological conditions.
    Disease range: chronic back pain through to cancer.
  • 8 Extraordinary meridians for constitutional restructuring, childhood illness and injuries, and illness which originated in childhood.
    Disease range: food intolerances and other allergies which originated in childhood. Moderation of birth defects and psychological disorders originating from birth, birth trauma or early childhood.
  • 2 Bisecting abdominal meridians for urogenital and reproductive health.

TREATMENT COURSE LENGTHS
These vary according to the type of meridian implicated. Classical protocols vary in length dependent on the energetic class of channel utilized, however all Classical protocols can be performed quite successfully with treatment performed on a weekly basis.
Most often, considerable benefit is felt after one treatment. After two to four treatments, there is a very clear indication of the effect of the treatment. Many acute conditions can even resolve in that initial period.

PHYSICAL THERAPY
Physical Therapy as practiced by Sacred Geometry Healing Arts utilizes detailed movement based analysis and the effects of repetitive or pathological movement to diagnose and identify the underlying cause of pain or disability. Clients are instructed in the cause of injury following a detailed evaluation and following diagnosis, are instructed in appropriate body mechanics, joint conservation, posture, and exercise to correct the underlying pathology and prevent recurrence of injury. Sacred Geometry Healing Arts also makes extensive use of state of the art manual therapy techniques which are 100% painless and can afford immediate and remarkable recovery from pain and disability from a wide variety of musculoskeletal injuries.

RESTORATIVE MASSAGE
Sacred Geometry Restorative Massage is a unique form of Asian bodywork based on principles of Chinese medicine that primarily utilizes the forearm and affords deep, full, and thorough movement of soft tissue without pain to the client or repetitive motion injury to the clinician. The massage protocol, or “kata”, is a full body massage that is an outstanding form of sports massage, a means of maintaining good musculoskeletal health, and a compatible and complementary modality when used in conjunction with Classical Acupuncture or traditional western Physical Therapy.  

Robert Korody MS PT LAc

By appointment only, Monday through Sunday.

Please call or text 347-610-1688.

About your clinician:

Robert is a NYS licensed Acupuncturist, Physical Therapist, and Massage Practitioner with 55 years combined experience.

Treatment procedures are specific to the client and labor intensive with regards to both treatment and patient. Treatment sessions are one to two hours on a one to one basis depending on the nature of the complaint and the protocols utilized. The objective of client care is complete resolution of complaint through identification and accurate diagnosis, treatment specific to the individual, and appropriate patient education to prevent recurrence.

Range of Services Offered:
1) Classical Chinese Acupuncture

2) Physical therapy with strong emphasis on manual and soft tissue techniques.

3) Restorative Massage – Deep tissue work done primarily with the forearm.

 

Acupuncture Session

Price Varies 1 minute

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